SEEKING OBSERVING TEAMS FOR COMMUNITY SCIENCE PROJECT

KEY PROJECT DATES
  • Winter & Spring 2024 – Training Workshops and Practices for Local Observing Teams
  • April 8, 2024 – Total Solar Eclipse

The telescope, camera, and computer used by each team will be kept by your community to become a free resource for anyone in your community to use.

Teams are filling up! We are still seeking teams for Site 017, near McLeansboro, IL,  and Site 025, near Ashtabula, OH

CATE 2024 PROJECT

On April 8th, 2024, a total solar eclipse (where the moon completely blocks out the Sun) will cross over the U.S., with the path of totality spanning from Texas, through the Midwest, and up through Maine. The Citizen Continental America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) 2024 experiment, funded by the National Science Foundation and NASA, is placing about 40 identical telescope setups along the path of totality to be teamed by groups of community scientists. All teams will be provided with a telescope, camera, laptop, various other observing equipment, and educational materials.

LOCAL OBSERVING TEAMS

We are seeking teams (minimum of 3 people) who live along the path of totality. No science background or previous eclipse experience is needed! You just need an interest in learning about telescopes and eclipses, and getting your community curious about the eclipse.
Participation in this project will last from Fall 2023 through Spring 2024.

Teams will receive a $750 honorarium for their time to:

  • Attend at least 4 practice observation sessions
  • Participate in community education and engagement activities leading up to, during, and after the eclipse
  • Take data during the April 8th total solar eclipse

This is your opportunity to participate in a unique study of a rare astronomical phenomenon alongside teams across the US. You will get a chance to learn about solar eclipses and observation techniques, and contribute to world-class astronomy. You also will develop new skills and connections with other people interested in solar science, and gain first-hand knowledge of how large community science projects are managed.